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Whats your character creation process?

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It's normally that I'm inspired by a book, music, or something for a character concept.
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http://www.guildwars2roleplayers.com/forum/m/2737230/viewthread/20134607-tcbg-beth-feywind-permawip-comments-welcome/post/132420751#post_132420751
http://www.guildwars2roleplayers.com/forum/m/2737230/viewthread/30880464-tc-karigan-gyren
http://www.guildwars2roleplayers.com/home/m/2737230/viewthread/31135773-researcher-trixxi/page/1
Posted Feb 27, 18
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For me, it's super simple. After a name/race/class(and sometimes before even that), I come up with three interesting/character-important facts about the character, or sometimes I'll instead pick three qualities about the character that they represent strongly. I call these 'Truths'. I've been tabletopping for 15 years, and this has been my process for the vast majority of that for both PCs and NPCs(when I'm GMing) alike. For PCs, I'll expand on those three Truths to build out a full character, but as NPCs I'll use the Truths to build a physical description and then use them to inform their actions and modifiers if they need to roll dice.

I haven't fully figured out what I'm doing with Bjorn here yet, but here are his three Truths:
-Bjorn is old, and proud of it.
-Bjorn never gets into a fight he can reasonably prevent or avoid.
-Bjorn has buried three of his children.

As you can see, the Truths I picked here all help to inform his actions and reactions, but more than that, they open a myriad of questions themselves, which either get answered as I need things to fill in on a sheet, or else get answered in play when a plot hook is needed.

Quick edit: If you ever come to a blank, use the first thing that comes to your head, and roll with it. Trust yourself!
Posted Jul 3, 18 · Last edited Jul 3, 18
A mix of inspiration and RP. My original concept for Alex was of an over the top, flashy, womanizing performer. I had such a character in GW1, but rarely got to RP him. So, I had the idea of having a farmboy find his journal and try to emulate him. But, as is often the case, I let RP define him. Alex did indeed succeed in his first attempt to seduce a young mesmer...and through carelessness broke her heart. He was horrified by his actions and as a result developed a peculiar trait in response...he will rarely, if ever, flirt with someone who has not first flirted with him. He is deathly afraid of seducing and crushing anyone else. Now, if they flirt first all bets are off...

So, in Alex's case, part of it, the core, was planned in advance...but the details were filled in during roleplay. I always try to let my characters flesh out and grow organically.
Posted Jul 5, 18
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i click 'create' and then select a race and class and then i finish the tutorial and then i go and beat nerd
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Posted Jul 5, 18
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Like others have said here, I play with the makeover kit, when I come to a desired and satisfactory result then I go to Fantasy Name Generator and start browsing for names only to realize that half the names they give us don't even make sense or can't even be physically pronounced, so I spend the rest of the week trying to find a name that fits.

If it's a human, then I go to Behind the Name and look for names there, only to then realize that no matter what human I create he'll probably end up looking similar to some other human in game so I end up making a Sylvari instead, which means I need to look for Welsh names and in the meantime try to decipher how the fuck the way you pronounce a welsh name is even closely related to the way its written.

Then after I make then, I use one of the million leveling scrolls that are stashed in my bank, play Fashion Wars and rage at the clipping or the fact that the shirt dyes differently to the pants and the boots and just slap a monochromatic ensemble and call it a day, before logging back the next day to completely change their outfit because I didn't like what I made previously. With luck, I probably come up with something that I like and then voila.

Unless it's a Charr or an Asura, where I just use the cultural armors because everything else looks dreadful on them.
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Posted Jul 6, 18 · Last edited Jul 6, 18
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Trial and Error - A rather terrible way to do it since you fail and restart over and over again, losing time and patience until you've basically driven yourself insane only in the end to realize that none of it ends up being worth it because someone will always be there to shit on your ideas anyway.
ShiraRaven.4037
Posted Jul 6, 18
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Creating a character for me is like kindling a small spark into a large, self-sustaining fire. Some people try rubbing sticks together to brute force the process. I think that's an incredible waste of time; as Lindybeige would tell you, people living in ancient and medieval civilizations who depended on fire for almost everything weren't necessarily masters of lighting fires out of nothing but sticks and twigs. Most of them actually took a more common and sensible approach for their time and place.

They borrowed it from their neighbors.

Yes, story elements are often, in fact, borrowed. Of course, you could wrack your brain trying to pull a fully-formed person out of the aether but that sounds like work and I would actually prefer to do less of that, so I borrow people from... well, wherever I can find them. History books, novels, real-life experiences. The wonderful thing about people is there are just so many of them to choose from that you hardly ever need to create one from scratch unless you're literally the parent of a child, in which case have fun not sleeping for several months or maybe even years. Parenthood. Always a chore!

Now, assuming you've mastered the art of collecting people, or at least the parts of them that are most memorable to you, and preferably only the memories of their existence rather than the full fleshy bits, you now have everything you need to write a character... almost! There are actually quite a few questions that you might want to sort out before placing them in a scene.

There are hundreds of books on how to write a character sheet. I use one that I found in a book by Randy Ingermanson as a foundation because it works for me so far and I like his style:

Spoiler: Randy's Character SheetShow

Sometimes I skip the questions that I don't care to answer for whatever reason or maybe I add things that seem important to that character in particular. Either way, personality type is where I slow down and check out a webpage on the Big Five personality traits which many psychologists seem to agree are important dimensions of personality across quite a few cultures. Personality affects the way people tend to react to certain situations in a predictable way and I would rather create characters that don't all match my own personality traits because that would be really boring.

While I'm considering my character's personality, I'm also doing research on their culture. What languages they speak, whether their communities had gendered expectations of them, how well they fit those expectations and what their relationship is with their family in general. I see no separation whatsoever between researching a character's personality and researching the cultural parameters that their sense of self was born within. In fact, I believe that the two are inseparable and so worldbuilding is, to me, another facet of character building. If I wanted to write a character of Kournan ancestry, I would want to know everything I can about Kourna. Then I would ask myself how this community of Kournan-born people ended up in Kryta, how long they have been there, how much of their culture they have fought to retain, and how much of that culture this character has chosen to accept or reject. Essentially, what their chosen relationship is with their culture.

In short, there is really nothing short about my characterization process. I could spend a full working day creating one character and researching their cultural background then playing out different scenarios of how they've chosen to relate to it while searching for the one that I believe offers them the most interesting inner conflict. The end result is a character that feels real to me, embedded in a world that feels even more deep and broad and full of real people. I find it quite satisfying.
Posted Jul 6, 18 · Last edited Jul 6, 18
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I usually rummage around in a garbage bin for an hour or two until I find something I can work with.
IGN: maiyo.3582 // GW2 tumblr

Elionai
Posted Jul 6, 18
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"Hey, this idea would be hilarious! But how would a joke like that actually work in real life?"

-2 hours later-

"Hello yes this is my new trash son thank you."
Posted Jul 6, 18
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I would not say I have one phase of character creation, I have two.

The first one is just the looks and surface story of the character. I choose the race and appearance of the character, which will set the name, choose them a very vague story, give them a very long term goal (often endless). You really just create the framework that makes your character playable ; But it is still very shallow at this moment and unsuited to play anything but an amnesia-stricken character or someone's apprentice. But it is playable nonetheless and can be brought onto the roleplaying scene until the second phase unravels.

And this second part is just researching more infos. This is when I flesh out all the details of the character that were not needed to start playing but will make excellent additions to adjust or justify their behaviour. It is everything that is not surface, so everything that can be changed until you bring it up in roleplay and set it in stone. This is a phase that can span the entire playtime with the character, as you can always find new small details to add to their story to make them more compelling to you and your partners.

To put it simply, two phases : Making the character, fleshing it out while playing it
Posted Jul 15, 18
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